Tuesday, June 16, 2015

Pope Wants Global Power To Impose Climate Change Agenda On The World

Pope Francis would like to see a new global political authority to coerce the “rich” nations of the West to force citizens to adopt radical lifestyle and energy consumption changes in response to unverified and widely debunked climate change alarmism.
“Humanity is called to take note of the need for changes in lifestyle and changes in methods of production and consumption to combat this warming, or at least the human causes that produce and accentuate it,” he wrote in a draft of a papal encyclical. “Numerous scientific studies indicate that the greater part of the global warming in recent decades is due to the great concentration of greenhouse gases … given off above all because of human activity.”
The leaked draft echoes one issued by Francis’ predecessor, Pope Benedict XVI, who in 2009 proposed an authoritarian United Nations on steroids to deal with the world’s economic problems and injustices.
The release of the encyclical comes ahead of international climate negotiations in Paris this December.
“By staking out the Vatican’s position on climate change, the pope is telling the world that protecting the environment is not a niche issue — it’s a human, personal and moral issue,” writes Jennifer Andreassen for the Environmental Defense Fund, an organization partnered with the Carlyle Group, Walmart and McDonalds.
The draft declares Pope Francis is in sync with the environmental movement and its objectives.
No Scientific Proof of Man-made Climate Change
Some members of the environmental movement, however, are less than unanimous in the opinion that climate change is a result of human activity.
“There is no scientific proof that human emissions of carbon dioxide are the dominant cause of the minor warming of the Earth’s atmosphere over the past 100 years,” Dr. Patrick Moore, a co-founder of Greenpeace, argued before the Senate Environmental and Public Works Committee’s Subcommittee on Oversight last February.
Moore aded that “perhaps the simplest way to expose the fallacy of extreme certainty is to look at the historical record.”
“When modern life evolved over 500 million years ago, CO2 was more than 10 times higher than today, yet life flourished at this time. Then an ice age occurred 450 million years ago when carbon dioxide was 10 times higher than today,” he said.
Moore quit Greenpeace after the organization veered hard to the political left. The organization is funded by the Rockefeller Brothers and other globalist foundations.

121 Illegal Aliens Avoid deporataion Charged With Murder

Between 2010 and 2014, a group of 121 illegal aliens were held by Immigration and Customs Enforcement and scheduled for deportation. Despite being scheduled for deportation, they were never removed from the country and have now been charged with murder.
From ICE:

This revelation came as a result of an inquiry from Senators Chuck Grassley and Jeff Flake about Apolinar Altamirano, an illegal alien charged with murdering Arizona convenience store clerk Grant Ronnebeck. Altamirano was supposed to be deported after racking up a previous criminal history. Instead, he was able to stay and took the life of an innocent American.
As a result of ICE providing this information, Grassley and Senator Jeff Sessions have a sent a letter to Attorney General Loretta Lynch, Secretary of State John Kerry and Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson demanding answers.
"According to information provided by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), up to 121 homicides in the U.S. could have been avoided between Fiscal Year 2010 and FY 2014 had this administration removed from our borders aliens with criminal convictions instead of releasing them back into society where they could commit more crimes," the letter states. "I am writing to ask whether the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the State Department, and the Justice Department are fully leveraging existing tools and resources to prevent these dangerous outcomes."
Lynch, Kerry and Johnson have until July 6 to respond.

In January, legislation was introduced in the Senate to stop Homeland Security's "catch and release" program.
The Department of Homeland Security currently has a policy in place known as "catch and release," meaning violent illegal aliens are arrested, processed and put back onto American streets if their home countries won't take them back.

According to Judicary Comimittee Chairman Chuck Grassley's office, the policy was "created by a 2001 Supreme Court decision (Zadvydas v. Davis), which prohibits immigrants who had been ordered removed from being detained for more than six months. The Court expanded this decision to apply to all illegal immigrants in Clark v. Martinez in 2005."

This catch and release policy is not only demoralizing to Immigration and Border Patrol Agents, but it's dangerous and deadly. There are countless examples of violent assault and murders committed by illegal aliens after being arrested and released by federal authorities.
In 2013, DHS admitted to releasing 36,000 violent criminal aliens charged and convicted of crimes like assault with a deadly weapon, child-rape, rape, participating in street gangs, aggravated assault and murder onto American streets.

Donald Trump Ready to Announce His Plans For 2016 Presidential Race

WASHINGTON — With a presidential field approaching 20 high-profile Republicans, the GOP's 2016 class offers voters a little bit of everything.
There is the top-tier, a group that includes former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, who formally launched his candidacy on Monday. There are the single-issue candidates such as South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham, who talks about national security and little else. There are even the quixotic underdogs, such as Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, ambitious against all odds.
And then there is Donald Trump.
The Donald, as he is known as a celebrity, will announce his 2016 intentions on Tuesday at a Manhattan skyscraper that bears his name.
He is a businessman, a reality television star and a master of self-promotion. And should he decide to run, Trump is positioned to have a greater impact on the early months of the Republican presidential primary contest than many GOP leaders would like.
Should he get in, Trump would be required to release a personal financial disclosure that would reveal intimate details about his personal finances. The disclosure would include his net worth, sources of income, liabilities and assets. He would have to reveal the same information for his wife and dependent children.
Trump is ready to do so. On Tuesday, he will share details about his personal finances that reveal a net worth of $9 billion, according to a person close to his potential campaign who spoke on the condition of anonymity so as not to pre-empt the announcement.
The financial disclosure, required of all candidates for president, was thought to be the final obstacle blocking Trump from launching a 2016 campaign.
Based on guidelines recently announced by the television networks, Trump could play a prominent role in the upcoming nationally televised Republican debate in August.
Those who rank in the top 10 in national polls — and Trump currently does, although he's close to the bottom — will earn a place on the debate stage. That could place Trump in a debate alongside leading candidates such as Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio and Bush.
"Selfishly, the networks would put me on because I get great ratings," Trump said in a recent interview with The Associated Press.
Trump has teased presidential runs before, and always backed out. But there are signs that he's more serious this time around.
After forming a presidential exploratory committee in March, Trump says he has hired political operatives on the ground in Iowa, New Hampshire and South Carolina. He has also been a frequent visitor to the early voting states in recent months.
Perhaps most significantly, he said he would not renew his contract with NBC for his reality show, "The Apprentice." He cannot appear on the network and run for president at the same time.

Monday, June 15, 2015

Hillary Clinton And Democrats Distance Themselves From Obama TPP Trade Deals

DES MOINES, Iowa — Hillary Rodham Clinton is distancing herself from President Barack Obama over a contentious trade proposal, encouraging the president to address concerns raised by congressional Democrats and negotiate a better deal with 11 Pacific Rim nations.
The Democratic presidential front-runner on Sunday told Iowa Democrats that Obama should seek more concessions as a way to improve the Trans Pacific Partnership and suggested she'd drive a harder bargain than Obama.
"No president would be a tougher negotiator on behalf of American workers, either with our trade partners or Republicans on Capitol Hill, than I would be," Clinton said. But Clinton, who is campaigning Monday in New Hampshire, declined to take a firm stance on the trade deal that has split Obama from House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi and rank-and-filed Democrats.
That wasn't acceptable to one of her chief Democratic rivals for the 2016 race, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders.
"Is she for it? Is she against it?" Sanders told reporters in Indianola, Iowa. "Those are your two options."
The White House and Republican leaders in Congress are facing long odds in reviving the legislation after congressional Democrats helped defeat a job retraining program last week in a blow to Obama's attempt to secure so-called fast track authority. Without the authority to negotiate trade deals that Congress can approve or reject, but not amend, the president would face difficulty in securing the Asia trade deal after years of work.
Congressional Republicans have suggested they may try to revive the bill as early as this week. Pelosi decided to side with House Democrats and oppose Obama's plan, saying it required "a better deal for America's workers."
In Iowa, Clinton appeared to seek middle ground, saying while some support the deal and others vehemently oppose it, "I kind of fall in the group that says 'what's in it?' And 'let's make it as good as it can be, and then let's make a decision.'"
But that is unlikely to satisfy liberals and labor unions in the party who have organized against the trade pact.
Sanders has made his opposition to the TPP one of the centerpieces of his uphill campaign. Addressing Democratic activists in a park pavilion, the so-called "democratic socialist" railed against what he called a "disastrous" trade deal and said he would do everything he could to scuttle it.
"I kind of think people would prefer to hear what your position is — are you for it or against it?" Sanders said, asked later by reporters about Clinton's trade comments. "Rather than passing the buck and saying well, in a sense, I don't have a position. That is not leadership."
Former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley has also opposed the deal and likened it to the North American Free Trade Agreement signed into law by President Bill Clinton in 1993.
Democratic leaders, O'Malley said, should "step up and urge Congress not to fast track this bad trade deal. We've seen this movie before with NAFTA — a bad trade deal that devastated communities across the country and cost a million American jobs." His statement made no mention of Clinton.

Gov. Jeb Bush Formally Enter 2016 Race For President

WASHINGTON — Jeb Bush is ready to launch a Republican presidential bid months in the making on Monday by asserting his commitment to the "most vulnerable in our society," an approach targeting the broader American electorate even as he faces questions about his policies from conservatives in his own party.
Six months after he got the 2016 campaign started by saying he was considering a bid, the 62-year-old former Florida governor will formally enter the race with a speech and rally near his south Florida home at Miami Dade University, an institution selected because it serves a large and diverse student body that's symbolic of the nation he seeks to lead.
"My core beliefs start with the premise that the most vulnerable in our society should be in the front of the line and not the back," Bush says in a video featuring women, minorities and a disabled child to be aired at the event before his Monday afternoon announcement speech. "What we need is new leadership that takes conservative principles and applies them so that people can rise up."
Bush joins the crowded Republican campaign in some ways in a commanding position. The brother of one president and son of another, Bush has likely raised a recording- breaking amount of money to support his candidacy and conceived of a new approach on how to structure his campaign, both aimed at allowing him to make a deep run into the GOP primaries.
But on other measures, early public opinion polls among them, he has yet to break out. While unquestionably one of the top-tier candidates in the GOP race, he is also only one of several in a capable Republican field that does not have a true front-runner.
In the past six months, Bush has made clear he will remain committed to his core beliefs in the campaign to come — even if his positions on immigration and education standards are deeply unpopular among the conservative base of the party that plays an outsized role in the GOP primaries.
"I'm not going to change who I am," Bush said as he wrapped up a week-long European trip this weekend. "I respect people who may not agree with me, but I'm not going to change my views because today someone has a view that's different."
Bush is one of 11 major Republicans in the hunt for the nomination. Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker and Ohio Gov. John Kasich are among those still deciding whether to join a field that could end up just shy of 20.
But few among them entered the race with such a high expectations of success as did Bush. Those expectations have seemed a burden at times.
Take, for example, the question of whether Bush will report raising $100 million for his campaign in the first six months of the year. Lost amid the "will he or won't he" is that Bush probably will have raised more in six months than former presidential nominee Mitt Romney raised in the first year before the 2012 election.
Still, Bush's return to politics since leaving the governor's office in 2007 has been underwhelming at times.
His speaking style often leaves something to be desired, particularly when compared with some opponents. He sometimes gets snippy during long campaign days. While detailed policy questions are often his strength, he struggled for several days last month to answer a predictable question about the war in Iraq waged by his brother, former President George W. Bush.
Bush's team acknowledges political challenges, but dismisses critics who decry a recent staffing shift as proof of a nascent campaign already in crisis. Just as his strengths are exaggerated, they say, so are his weaknesses.
"Gov. Bush recognizes, and he's going to highlight on Monday, the fact that he needs to earn every vote — and he's going to take nothing and nobody for granted," campaign spokesman Tim Miller said.
Indeed, Bush's team is about to get more aggressive. In his speech Monday, Bush plans to make the case that those involved in creating Washington's problems can't fix them. The point is designed to jab Republican senators — one of them his political protégé in Florida, Marco Rubio — who are also seeking the presidential nomination.
And Bush's fundraising operation is not slowing down.
After touring four early-voting states, Bush quickly launches a private fundraising tour with stops in at least 11 cities before the end of the month. Two events alone — a reception at Union Station in Washington on Friday and a breakfast the following week on Seventh Avenue in New York — will account for almost $2 million in new campaign cash, according to invitations that list more than 75 donors committed to raising big money.